Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 1 – The Love/Breakup Letter

Welcome to our series on Design Thinking methods and activities. You’ll find a full list of posts in this series at the end of the page.

The Love/Breakup Letter

Primary Goal To identify positive and negative attributes/elements/features in your brand, product, company, or event.
When To Use During a kick-off session with a group that is familiar with a pre-existing concept, brand, event and/or application.
Time Required 30-45 minutes
Number of Participants 2-6 (ideally)
Who Should Participate? Stakeholders, Users, or Product Teams
Supplies Pens or pencils, lined sheets of paper (bonus supply: heart or smiley/sad face stickers for dramatic effect)

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Design Thinking Toolkit, Part 2: The Supply List

This is the second post in a series on Design Thinking methods and tools. You’ll find a full list of posts in this series at the end of the page.

Before we dive too deeply into design thinking exercises, I want to help you set the stage with the proper tools and materials. At Atomic, we’ve been holding workshops and project kickoffs for 15 years, so we’ve done all the user testing for you! Here, you’ll find a collection of our most loved and used tools for group activities. Read more on Design Thinking Toolkit, Part 2: The Supply List…

6 More Helpful Sketch Shortcuts


To continue the good work that my colleague Bryan started last October, I have six more great Sketch shortcuts to add to the mix.

In the last couple of years, Sketch has almost completely replaced Photoshop as my go-to for UI build-out. Though it can still occasionally be fussy (I’m looking at you, SVG exports), it has all of the core features I need to quickly iterate and concept lovely, usable interfaces.
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Pricing & Membership Models: Part Three – Layouts

We’ve already determined how our plans will be structured and what the most important value propositions are. Now for the fun part: how to design the layout of your models and values. The main goal here is conversions—convert as many users to become paying members as quickly as possible. There are many ways to express your models, but ideally you’ll choose the one that best fits your business.

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Pricing & Membership Models: Part Two – Value Propositions

In part one of this series, we explored the Who, What, Where, and How of our membership and pricing models. Now it’s time to think about the value propositions that will speak to best to users.

This approach can be broken into three sections: Discover, Test, and Pivot. Read more on Pricing & Membership Models: Part Two – Value Propositions…

Pricing & Membership Models: Part One – The Structure

It’s almost time to launch that product that you’ve been working on for months (maybe years?!) and you want to ensure that users will not only sign-up in droves, but also fork over the cash. Thoughtful pricing models and a solid membership structure will let you make it rain in dollars and users.

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Pushing Past Logos: Weekend Blitz & Design’s Evolving Role

I had the pleasure, once again, to attend Design For Good Weekend Blitz from the West Michigan AIGA, and let me tell you, the tides are changing in West Michigan’s field of design.

Weekend Blitz is a 3-day event where non-profit organizations are paired with teams of designers, developers, and poly-skilled creatives hailing from all over West Michigan. Teams must solve tough design and business problems in a very limited time span, all the while keeping their clients informed and team members busy and engaged. Read more on Pushing Past Logos: Weekend Blitz & Design’s Evolving Role…

Dazed & Confused: How to Keep Your Clients in the Know

Ever had a confused client? Not double-shot-of-espresso confusion, but the “what’s a wireframe?” or “why are you spending all my money?” type of confusion. You can offer them lightning-fast shots of clarity by preparing timelines, defining purpose, and setting expectations. It’s quite simple actually.

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