3 Design Techniques for Non-Designers

Design and design thinking can’t solve all of the world’s problems. But design is noticed by others, whether your company/product has considered it or not. And design can make your product more usable and accessible.

From your website to your physical space to the way you respond to emails to your actual product or service, it’s worthwhile to ask yourself, “Is this designed the way I want my customers or users to experience it?” Read more on 3 Design Techniques for Non-Designers…

Why Hire a Software Consultancy?

As any product company knows, software development can be difficult to wrangle. Huge buckets of features, short timelines, and fierce marketplace competition can make it a major challenge to handle a release in-house, prompting many companies to reach out to software consultancies for help. 

Sometimes, this call for help comes a little too late, with only the threat of missing a release convincing a company to justify the cost of outsourcing the work. In this post, I’ll explain why it’s worth your while to work with a software consultancy right from the start.
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7 Guidelines for Constructive Design Feedback

If you’re a client working with a polyvalent team of makers at Atomic Object, one of the most valuable things you can do is to give feedback throughout the project. This may come as a shock to you. In the past, you might have been involved in a project where feedback wasn’t welcome—or even treated as downright hostile. If that’s the case, let me be the first (and hopefully not the last) to apologize on behalf of consultants everywhere. Read more on 7 Guidelines for Constructive Design Feedback…

DevOps – Software Delivery Done Correctly

A successful software project consists of much more than actually writing software. There are product development concerns, usability concerns, aesthetic concerns, and, of course, delivery concerns.

It often seems that the delivery phase of software development project is neglected. The product is valuable, the design sleek, and the code well-written and tested—but the final handoff and deployment have been neglected. The problem is, “‘dev complete’ is a long long way from ‘live, in production, stable, making money’” (Nelson-Smith, 2010).

In recent years, the DevOps movement has emerged as a response to some of these problems—improving deployment and management of software that has already been written. Read more on DevOps – Software Delivery Done Correctly…

Minimum Viable Product: Pick Any Two

As the minimum viable product idea becomes mainstream, I’m starting to hear “MVP” used to justify any minimal effort. It’s great that people want to benefit from being lean and agile, but it’s also absolutely vital that an MVP answers your important questions. There are many kinds of MVPs and most of them are anything but minimal effort. Thinking of an MVP as minimal effort risks wasting the effort completely.

In software we often balance competing goals. I’m going to deconstruct the MVP as tension between three different kinds of questions. Thinking this way helps you prioritize what you want out of your MVPs. It’s more useful than trying to find the sweet spot on a Venn diagram of potential products. Read more on Minimum Viable Product: Pick Any Two…

Don’t Skimp on Research, Design, and Planning

Our clients come to us with really cool ideas for web, mobile, and embedded apps. Usually, they know their domain inside and out, and they’ve come up with a great way to improve the world with some custom new software.

But we’ve learned over the years is that a little bit of planning before jumping into the code goes a long way. Read more on Don’t Skimp on Research, Design, and Planning…