GraphQL + Apollo – Part 1: An Introduction

This past September, I attended the Strange Loop conference in St. Louis. Among the plethora of great talks that I attended was one about GraphQL, given by Lee Byron. This talk, supplemented by a great deal of research, convinced me that I should use GraphQL in the project that I started a couple of months ago.
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Timing Your Queries in Knex.js for Node.js

While developing web applications, I keep a close eye on performance issues, particularly in database queries. In my latest project, I’ve been using Knex.js, a SQL query builder for Node.js.

I developed a method of logging the queries executed by Knex.js as well as the execution times for each query. This method can be applied to nearly any application that uses Knex.js, and it uses a few features of Knex.js that I didn’t notice immediately, so I thought I’d share this small but useful bit of code.
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Parsing Excel Files with Ruby

In this post, I will review options for parsing Excel files using Ruby. I’ll discuss the different types of Excel files and introduce some of the Ruby libraries that exist for working with them. Note that I focus mostly on reading Excel files in this post, but there is some discussion around writing/updating them as well.
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Factory.ts: A Factory Generator for Test Data Using TypeScript

I’ve been using TypeScript on a React/Redux project, and I’m really enjoying it.

A year and a half ago, I tried to use TypeScript with an Angular project, and I found that it didn’t add that much. But with version 2.0 and on, TypeScript has really come into its own. Structural typing allows you to express concepts in TypeScript that I’ve never been able to express before. In particular, mapped types are just insanely useful.
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Code Generation for Rails Utility Scripts

It seems that on every Rails project I work on, I end up writing utility scripts that make changes to the production data in some way or another. Perhaps it’s pre-loading hundreds of user accounts for a customer that wants to provide a spreadsheet of users, or populating an account with fake data that can be used for a demo, or manually fixing a data integration issue with an external system. Often, this requires parsing and processing a source file (like a CSV file). Read more on Code Generation for Rails Utility Scripts…

A Simple Message Queue for C

Let’s face it, when you’re doing embedded development, you really don’t have a lot of great tools at your disposal. If you’re lucky, you might have a C99-compliant compiler and a microcontroller with floating-point hardware and DMA. If you’re unlucky you might have a microcontroller that doesn’t actually have a stack and a compiler that doesn’t support using structures as function arguments!

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