Toggling Switches when the Server Says “No”

We had an interesting user experience challenge on a recent project. When the system was in a particular state, the user was allowed to toggle a switch. The system would immediately acknowledge the toggle and, since it was on a local network, do so faster than the user could perceive.

Our problem was that sometimes, in situations our application couldn’t track because we didn’t have the necessary information, the server was responding negatively to the toggle. Our challenge: how to communicate that yes, we got your click, but we can’t actually toggle the underlying item right now.
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Design Thinking and Atomic Project Leadership

IDEO sees design thinking as three lenses through which we can view design: desirability (human), viability (business), and feasibility (technical). Atomic’s project leadership roles (Design, Delivery, Development) share a significant alignment with these dimensions. That alignment strengthens our long-held belief that everyone on the team has a place in the design conversation.
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Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 4 – Start Your Day

Welcome to our series on Design Thinking methods and activities. You’ll find a full list of posts in this series at the end of the page.

Start Your Day is one of the most beloved and consistently used exercises at Atomic. I’m also a touch biased because I love this activity and, to date, so has every team I’ve worked with.

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Should UX/UI Designers Code? Finding a Balance Between Yes and No

“Should software designers code?” I have heard this question asked over and over again within the design community. There’s not a definitive answer, but if we extrapolate the question and ask it in a few different ways, I think we can better understand the role a designer plays in writing code for projects. Read more on Should UX/UI Designers Code? Finding a Balance Between Yes and No…

“Most Advanced, Yet Acceptable” Software Design

Ever had a refreshing ice-cold Mexican Coca-Cola in that sweet glass bottle? The bottle just looks and feels right. Now close your eyes. Imagine the Shell Oil logo. It became so iconic that the company dropped its name from the displays at their filling stations. What about the fuselage of Air Force One? It pops instantly into mind, right? Anyone who has ever been to Johnson Space Center in Houston will also remember the interiors of Skylab and the Apollo moon mission capsules. All these objects are the work of one man: Raymond Loewy. Read more on “Most Advanced, Yet Acceptable” Software Design…

Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 2 – Story Mapping

Welcome to our series on Design Thinking methods and activities. You’ll find a full list of posts in this series at the end of the page.

Story Mapping

Primary Goal To get a detailed understanding of the user’s experience.

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Using Nested Symbols in Sketch to Build Powerful, Customizable, Enterprise UI Mock-ups – Part 3: Putting it All Together

In the previous two posts, we went through creating some basic building blocks, such as colors and icons as symbols, and combining them into nested symbols for buttons and table cell elements.

If you’ve already read those two posts, I hope you were able to think of other elements that could be “symbolized”–such as primary and secondary navigation, form elements, and other widgets.

Today, I want to talk about how we can put all of these elements together to quickly create Enterprise UI mock-ups that are flexible and customizable.
Read more on Using Nested Symbols in Sketch to Build Powerful, Customizable, Enterprise UI Mock-ups – Part 3: Putting it All Together…