Forcing SSL in Phoenix Framework

Using SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) in Phoenix Framework is simple. HTTPS encryption is an important step in securing transport-level data, but it also provides a streamlined experience to users in the browser. More browsers are discouraging the use of HTTP, which is good for users and the open web.

Here are a few steps I’ve found to get SSL in Phoenix, redirecting on unencrypted requests, and putting it all together to understand how it works.
Read more on Forcing SSL in Phoenix Framework…

Centralize Your Command Line with fish shell Functions

Developers use a lot of customizable tools, and it’s easy to reason through most of them. While text editors and IDEs come with config files and community standards for customizations, Unix-like shells can feel barren in comparison. However, fish shell acts as a highly configurable alternative to other shells. Read more on Centralize Your Command Line with fish shell Functions…

Phoenix Framework Support and Why Ruby on Rails Still Works

Functional programming has been successful through React and its derivatives on the front end. Why can’t we embrace it for the full stack? The solution for traditional model-template-view applications can be functional, too. A good incumbent is the Elixir language with Phoenix framework.
Read more on Phoenix Framework Support and Why Ruby on Rails Still Works…

Making Toast from Scratch in React-Redux

Getting UI elements for free is a good feeling. When it comes to popup notifications, other frameworks provide these components for free. For instance, Rails has flashes and Android has snackbars. React is a moving target, so pulling in external libraries can help simplify situations, but it may prevent extensibility later.
Read more on Making Toast from Scratch in React-Redux…