Diagrams as Software Documentation – When a Picture Says it Best

Software documentation is all too frequently overlooked or becomes irrelevant, lost in the inevitable wave of change. Accurate documentation requires not only thought and execution, but maintenance, as reality changes.

One form of documentation that is too frequently overlooked is a diagram. Read more on Diagrams as Software Documentation – When a Picture Says it Best…

Turbocharge Your Coding with Snippets

Hi. I’m Ross, and I’m a software developer who doesn’t really like typing. It’s not that I’m bad at it—I actually think I’m pretty good at it. It’s just that no matter how fast I type, my fingers can’t keep up with my brain. Lately, I’ve been addressing that gap by utilizing code snippets to auto-fill boilerplate code.

Read more on Turbocharge Your Coding with Snippets…

A UIStackView Hack for Stacking Child Views Compactly

Before I developed for iOS, I did a lot of Microsoft WPF programming. One of the layouts available on that platform was a WrapPanel.

Microsoft’s WrapPanel is similar to Apple’s UIStackView in that it arranges child elements into a single line that can be oriented horizontally or vertically. There are many differences, but the one I want to focus on is that a WrapPanel will space the content as close together as possible, and the size of the content is determined by its intrinsic content size. Read more on A UIStackView Hack for Stacking Child Views Compactly…

One Month at Atomic Object: Musings of a Corporate Defector

My on-boarding process at Atomic Object was almost a year in the making. While I was on assignment for GE Aviation to their joint venture company in Shanghai, China, I learned that my contract was not to be renewed for another year. It was part of a cost cutting measure to trim out a large number of corporate expats. This was not totally unexpected as our costs were extremely high.

Read more on One Month at Atomic Object: Musings of a Corporate Defector…

Clojure Development in Spacemacs

I’ve recently been doing some basic Clojure development, and it’s been a huge blast. I’ve played around with it in the past, but never bothered to fully set up a development environment. This time, however, I decided to spend a few evenings perfecting my workflow and becoming familiar with the tools available, focusing on my editor of choice: Spacemacs.
Read more on Clojure Development in Spacemacs…

More Robust Browser-Side Networking

What happens to your web application when used over a flaky network connection? Does it swallow errors and stop responding? Does it bounce users immediately to the browser’s built-in “no connection” page? Does it give you a way to continue using the application when network connectivity is restored?

It used to be acceptable to simply say that a web application could only be used when there was a consistent, reliable network connection. They are web applications, after all. But it’s time to stop using that excuse. Read more on More Robust Browser-Side Networking…

Build an Offline Demo of your Ember App with Ember CLI Mirage

Our client wanted a demo version of their Ember app to take to trade shows, use for sales demos, etc. Ideally, it would run on a laptop with no internet connection and not require the use of any developer tools. We decided to run the Ember app against a mocked backend.

Read more on Build an Offline Demo of your Ember App with Ember CLI Mirage…

Five Things I Wish I’d Known As a Design Student

I was recently asked to serve on an internship/job panel for design students at a local university. Upon reflecting on my post-graduation life, I realized some things I wish I knew as a student about to enter the workforce. I compiled those realizations into a list of advice for soon-to-be graduating students.
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Debugging Techniques: #1 Break the System into Small Pieces

My PC wouldn’t boot, didn’t even make a sound. I traced the problem down to a particular mounting screw, but there was nothing to indicate that this screw was problematic. It was a perfectly fine screw, correctly installed in the right place. How did I figure this out? Debugging!
Read more on Debugging Techniques: #1 Break the System into Small Pieces…

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