Clojure Development in Spacemacs

I’ve recently been doing some basic Clojure development, and it’s been a huge blast. I’ve played around with it in the past, but never bothered to fully set up a development environment. This time, however, I decided to spend a few evenings perfecting my workflow and becoming familiar with the tools available, focusing on my editor of choice: Spacemacs.
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IDE Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen

If you have ever found yourself working on iOS and Android projects, you’ve probably had to decide which IDE or text editor to use. Unfortunately, there are not a lot of options to choose from when it comes to native projects; however, this means that choosing an IDE is significantly easier. Android Studio is a great choice for Android development, and if you want to keep your environment consistent, AppCode is an excellent product.
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IDE vs. Text Editor: Choosing the Right Tool at the Right Time

In the programming community, there are an overwhelming number of opinions about text editors, IDEs, and other related tools. There are so many options out there and so many strong opinions that it’s really difficult to find the best tool for the job.

However, finding the right editor is extremely important! After all, text is the basic element of programming, so choosing a tool to manipulate text is one of the most fundamental decisions a programmer can make. Read more on IDE vs. Text Editor: Choosing the Right Tool at the Right Time…

CodeRunner: A Generalist’s Swiss Army Knife


Working as a maker at Atomic Object means being a generalist. Generalists must be able to quickly move between projects, languages, and tech stacks. We are expected to quickly pick up new languages and technologies–drawing from our expertise in the technologies that we already know well.

One tool I’ve found useful in picking up new technologies (or just trying things out) is CodeRunner. CodeRunner bills itself as a “code editor for Mac.” It’s an editor that’s preconfigured to build/run code in a variety of languages. In this blog post I will describe some of its features and cover how I’ve used it in my work. Read more on CodeRunner: A Generalist’s Swiss Army Knife…

Customizing IntelliJ for Emacs Compatibility

Atomic Object has a great tradition of making and customizing tools. It’s a habit I’ve gained and lost several times over my career — keeping tools sharp requires time and effort. Fortunately, one of the best things about becoming an Atom is that all of my colleagues care deeply about software, so it’s easy to find inspiration to start making tools again.

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A Month with the Atom Editor

Vim is a good friend of mine. When we met during my freshman year of college at MTU, we quickly hit it off. I never looked back with any regret at my tiny TI-85 screen, Notepad, or QBasic where I first tinkered with bending computing devices to my whims. Since then I have tried other editors, and even used a few for extended periods for a variety of reasons (e.g., Kate because of its SSHFS and KDE tie-ins, Visual Studio for its strength with all things Microsoft). Still, through it all, Vim has been my go-to editor for nearly 15 years.

I have been using Atom almost exclusively for the past month — without vim-mode. This was an intentional decision on my part. I didn’t have any complaints about how Vim had been working for me prior to picking up Atom. It, along with our built-to-Atomic-tastes configuration, did great navigating the mixed mobile & web project environment I was working in. I was just feeling ready to try something different when Atom came on the scene — something that wasn’t vim and didn’t work like vim. Plus, I dig the name and logo. ;) I figured, at the worst, I’d return to Vim after a while with a renewed appreciation for everything that makes it, well, Vim.

So, how has it gone? Read more on A Month with the Atom Editor…

My Favorite Emacs Add-Ons

I love Emacs. I’ll take it hands down over vim, Sublime, Atom, and company any day. I thought I would take some time to list some of my favorite bits of Emacs and how I use them in my daily workflow.

1. Magit

Magit is an Emacs interface for git. Beyond that, it’s the best interface for git I have ever used — better than the git CLI or third-party apps like SourceTree. Magit reduces most git commands (and all of their cryptic flags) to a series of one-character shortcuts. It also introduces interactive status and log buffers that are comparable to any other git gui out there (and better than many). The best part is that version control becomes part of my editing workflow and requires no context switching. Overall I find that it massively speeds up and simplifies my git workflow and encourages me to use my VCS to its fullest extent. Read more on My Favorite Emacs Add-Ons…

Editing the Future – Light Table, and Atom, and Then What?

Github recently announced their project to create their own programming editor called Atom. (Nice logo! *wink*) If you haven’t seen it, here’s a great hands-on post showing off its features.

In 2012, Chris Granger announced a project called Light Table, which I think was a recent mile marker on the same road as Atom.

Here’s some of what Light Table shares with Github’s Atom:

  • Both offer a web-based programming platform targeting customizability (Atom, LightTable).
  • Both leverage modern languages to implement the editor itself (Atom, LightTable).
  • Both envision open-source communities of 3rd party plugins (Atom, Light Table).

So if these two recent programming environment projects are points on a line, where does that line point? Read more on Editing the Future – Light Table, and Atom, and Then What?…