Integrating a Visual Git Interface into Your Workflow

Like many other developers at Atomic, my Git workflow relies heavily on the command line. I recently started using Visual Studio Code since my editor of choice, Spacemacs, did not have great React and TypeScript support.

Since I started using VS Code’s Git interface, I have seen an improvement in my productivity. Here are some benefits to using a GUI in your Git workflow. Read more on Integrating a Visual Git Interface into Your Workflow…

Four Steps To Maintaining a Clean Git History

Git is a very important tool. Not only does it keep a history of a project, but Git also makes it easy for a team to collaborate in a codebase. Although it’s such an important tool, it’s often under-utilized and on occasion, even neglected.

A clean Git history is easy to understand and tells a story about the project. It’s evident when features were added and how they were implemented. I’ve come to cherish a clean Git history on a project. The good news is, it’s not very difficult to keep this history clean. Read more on Four Steps To Maintaining a Clean Git History…

Git – It Makes Sense Once You Understand It

Learning Git can be overwhelming, especially if you have not had any previous experience with a version control system. Many Git tutorials begin with a few basic commands, and you can probably get by on those for most day-to-day tasks. But eventually, you’ll run into a situation that the tutorial didn’t cover (like, “Oops, I just committed to the wrong branch”).

Fortunately, a quick Google search will reveal a Stack Overflow post with a cryptic command to get the job done. And given the number of upvotes, it will probably work. But unless you understand why it worked, you’ll likely be right back there again the next time you run into a similar problem. Read more on Git – It Makes Sense Once You Understand It…

Sticky Documentation, Part 2: Source Control History as Documentation

Last week, I introduced a concept I’m calling “sticky documentation” and reviewed a few ways that we can make the most of the “stickiest” documentation we have: the code. Today, I’d like to talk about another form of “sticky” documentation: source control history. Read more on Sticky Documentation, Part 2: Source Control History as Documentation…

Configuring a Git-Controlled Home Directory with Ansible

Ansible is a configuration management tool that uses “playbooks”, special scripts that describe an intended configuration (rather than operations to get there), and “modules”, which make changes to reflect the playbook’s configuration. (For example, “runit should be present”, rather than “install runit”.) Read more on Configuring a Git-Controlled Home Directory with Ansible…

Read more on Configuring a Git-Controlled Home Directory with Ansible…