You’re Not the Only Imposter at the Office: 6 Strategies for Dealing with Imposter Syndrome at Work

Do you ever get the feeling that you don’t have any business doing the job that you do? That everyone else knows exactly what to say, while you trip over your words like a toddler in clown shoes? Yeah. Me too.

I work at one of the most prestigious software consultancies in Michigan, building multi-platform applications that are in active use by people who seem pretty happy. We have a rigorous interview process. But most days, I feel like the hiring team must’ve been asleep on the job when they let me in. Read more on You’re Not the Only Imposter at the Office: 6 Strategies for Dealing with Imposter Syndrome at Work…

Keep Your Temporary Hacks Temporary with a Shame.cs

In every codebase of a certain age, there are dark corners. Unloved, poorly-lit classes that smell vaguely of moldering wood and mothballs. Methods that creak when a lonely dev walks by. Small trees poking out of reactive pipelines, drawing sustenance from thick, loamy beds of commented-out code. We’ve all wandered through those codebases. Lately, I’ve been tidying up a few cobwebby windowsills in mine with a trick that I picked up from Harry over at CSS Wizardry. Read more on Keep Your Temporary Hacks Temporary with a Shame.cs…

Choosing the Right Release Cadence for Your Project

On software projects, choosing a release schedule that works for both your team and your client is essential to long-term project health. Release too often, and you risk coming off as frantic and harried to your customers, your clients, or both. Release too seldom, and you risk appearing stodgy, inflexible, and unresponsive. Read more on Choosing the Right Release Cadence for Your Project…

Code Like a Craftsman with a Vim Clutch

Stroll around our Grand Rapids office, and you’ll find some unique input methods. Curved, split, and mechanical keyboards, mice shaped like everything from sashimi to joysticks, giant trackpads, drawing tablets, Echo Dots, and Yetis. We like to keep things interesting when it comes to our workspaces.

For the last hundred days, I’ve been kicking around a centuries-old input method in a new context. Here’s how you can set up your own Vim clutch.
Read more on Code Like a Craftsman with a Vim Clutch…

Three Tips to Make Your Next Dependency Upgrade Easier

Over time, even well-managed web apps can see their dependencies fall behind. The JavaScript community moves fast, and if you don’t stay on top of it, you can wind up with a package.json from the stone ages (two months ago). A few weeks ago, my team upgraded an aging Ember 1.13 app to Ember 2.10. Here are three tips to help make your dependency upgrade process go smoother than ours. Read more on Three Tips to Make Your Next Dependency Upgrade Easier…

Supercharging Xamarin Studio’s Play Button with Custom Build Steps

As my team’s current project has morphed from a heavy Ember.js app running in a thin PhoneGap web view into a thin Ember.js front end driving a rich Xamarin back end, we’ve had to change our approach to build automation. Here’s how we leverage custom build steps in Xamarin Studio to make our workdays easier.
Read more on Supercharging Xamarin Studio’s Play Button with Custom Build Steps…

Life After Text Mode: How I Learned to Stop Typing So Much and Love the GUI Again

The command line is a powerful abstraction in the developer’s toolbox—a succinct line of communication directly into the heart of the operating system. A skilled developer can take a small window filled with nothing but a blinking cursor and turn it into a productive environment for building websites, apps, and experiences that delight, amaze, and inspire. But sometimes, we developers get so caught up in the productive asceticism of the command line that we forget about the world outside and all it has to offer. Three apps have me rethinking my Text Mode lifestyle. Read more on Life After Text Mode: How I Learned to Stop Typing So Much and Love the GUI Again…