A Moral Justification for Diversity In Tech – Why “Good for Business” Isn’t Good Enough

This past weekend, a memo by a Google employee criticizing the company’s diversity goals and practices was leaked to the media. The memo presents sexist and thoroughly debunked views about women, and the ensuing conversation about diversity has been both heated and informative. I have found, however, that there’s something mostly missing from this conversation: a moral case for diversity.

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Finding Your Path to a Second Career in Software Development

When I went back to school to pursue a bachelor’s degree in computer science, I found that I wasn’t alone. Even though I already had one degree and a few years of work experience, I went to study groups where I was the youngest person in the room.

Lots of people are investing in a second career, and for good reason. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer and IT occupations are slated to grow almost twice as fast as the national average and pay more than twice as much. The the ratio of open jobs to new grads with CS degrees is 10:1. Read more on Finding Your Path to a Second Career in Software Development…

Five Things to Think About When Considering TypeScript

I can’t imagine working on another JavaScript project without TypeScript, and I haven’t heard much talk of teams adopting TypeScript and regretting it. (For every hour you spend on TypeScript overhead, you probably save five hours of tracking down runtime errors.)

Nevertheless, I do think there are some conditions that could make TypeScript less valuable for a particular project or team. In this article, I’m going to talk about the things you ought to consider when weighing whether or not to add TypeScript to your project.  Read more on Five Things to Think About When Considering TypeScript…

Uncle Bob’s Clean Code: Irrelevant in the Age of Full-Stack JavaScript?

I recently picked up Clean Code by Robert C. Martin (a.k.a. Uncle Bob). I’ve found it to be particularly helpful in the practice of day-to-day software development. It contains some wisdom that has since become so engrained in the culture of the software development community that it almost sounds trite when you read it for the first time. But how relevant is it to the concerns of web development eight years after it was published?
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Coding For Fun – How to Avoid Creating a Second Job

When I was in school, programming was my favorite pastime. Now I code for a living, and though I still enjoy it, I find it more difficult to code for fun. I consider “for fun” to be distinct from “kind of fun professional development that is work, if I’m being honest.” If you have the time and energy to, say, work on an iOS app outside of work, this article probably isn’t for you. You’re already occupied. Good job. For those of you who, like me, have at least three WIP smartphone apps that you don’t want to touch ever again, this post is for you. Read more on Coding For Fun – How to Avoid Creating a Second Job…

Wrangling a Legacy Angular Project in 3 Steps

The value of having test coverage in any software application is pretty obvious: making features is a lot less scary when you have a test suite that will yell at you if you break something. The value of adding test coverage to a large legacy project, however, is not as clear—especially to stakeholders who need new features, not new tests for old features.

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