Consulting and the Four Stages of Competence

Recently I read an article that referenced The Four Stages of Competence, a learning model developed in the 1970’s by Noel Burch of Gordon Training International. The model is helpful for understanding the progression of learning as it applies to any skill–music, math, language, woodworking, skydiving, and yes, software. Read more on Consulting and the Four Stages of Competence…

Keeping Your Large Development Team Efficient

At Atomic, it is rare to see a project with 4 or more full-time developers on it at a single time. In general, we tend to lean toward smaller teams. However as our projects become more complex, our teams start to grow.

As a member of two of Atomic’s largest projects-to-date, I have noticed a few things we do to keep our big teams working effectively. Read more on Keeping Your Large Development Team Efficient…

9 Essential Tools for Project Communication

There are many things that contribute to the success of a project, but one of the most important is good communication with our clients.

Every project has its unique set of individuals and circumstances that dictate which forms of communication will work best, but for all projects the goal is the same: help everyone on the team make good decisions. Decisions require open channels of communication so information can flow back and forth as needed. Read more on 9 Essential Tools for Project Communication…

Making Smart Assumptions in a Project Budget

When we’re working with a client to define a custom software proposal and create a responsible budget, we’re always going to be in a position where there are unknowns. For example, a project may need to integrate with a third party service we’ve never used before. We have to assume the service works as advertised, but we really won’t know until we do some additional research and start working with the service. Read more on Making Smart Assumptions in a Project Budget…

Remote-First Communication for Project Teams

“If anyone is remote, you’re all remote.”

At Atomic Object, we value co-located teams. But not every team member can always be co-located. Larger project teams may have members from multiple offices. Some projects might involve working closely with other vendors. I experience this “remoteness” when I support the infrastructure needs of teams in our Ann Arbor and Detroit offices.

Read more on Remote-First Communication for Project Teams…