Your 1st Impression as a Development Candidate Is Your Writing

Atomic Object Detroit recently assessed dozens of candidates to find a summer development intern, and we’re continually receiving applications for full-time developers.

As I reflect on the candidates that I’ve assessed both here and at previous companies, I’m struck by how revealing each candidate’s first email correspondence is. Those who’ve left strong, positive first impressions on me and my team have almost always made it far in the interview process, while everyone else has almost never worked out well, even if we advanced them to a later stage initially.

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Orangizing an Ember.js App with the Awesome {{component}} Helper

In the past year, I’ve spent a lot of time developing a large, complex single-page app using Ember.js. One of the challenges when dealing with a complex SPA is organizing the many views and components within the app, especially when dealing with naturally “typed” data.

In this situation we often found we wanted a different view or component based on the type of the data being presented. The advantage to this is it keeps our templates, controllers, and components from growing out of control. Read more on Orangizing an Ember.js App with the Awesome {{component}} Helper…

Using Video to Share Your Design Ideas

I was recently on a project that required a fair amount of remote design reviews.  In this case, the designers were often asked to submit their designs digitally and did not have the luxury of presenting their work in person. The client would review the designs at a later time and get back to the designers with feedback. Read more on Using Video to Share Your Design Ideas…

Evaluating Expressions in iOS with Objective-C and Swift

Recently, I have been researching ways to evaluate string expressions such as "(1 + 3) * 5 / 2" in iOS. I have found that there is fantastic support to do this using the built in NSExpression and NSPredicate classes. In this post I will detail how these two classes can be utilized to evaluate expressions. Read more on Evaluating Expressions in iOS with Objective-C and Swift…

Dazed & Confused: How to Keep Your Clients in the Know

Ever had a confused client? Not double-shot-of-espresso confusion, but the “what’s a wireframe?” or “why are you spending all my money?” type of confusion. You can offer them lightning-fast shots of clarity by preparing timelines, defining purpose, and setting expectations. It’s quite simple actually.

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Why I Still Like Ember.js

I’ve been using Ember.js on and off on a variety of projects for nearly two years now. Ember has proven to be quite unique. Even after getting very, very familiar with it, I still quite like it. As with all things I’ve found in programming, it has caused me pain at times, but far less than expected based on how much I’ve used it.

Here are some of the things that keep me coming back to Ember for new projects.
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I Found a Bug, What Next?

Log it.

There, that was a simple blog post to write.

Well, some testers think it’s that simple, but there’s a more useful approach. To help remember it, use the RIMGEA testing mnemonic coined by Dr. Cem Kaner: Replicate it, Isolate it, Maximize it, Generalize it, Externalize it, And Say it Clearly and Dispassionately. Read more on I Found a Bug, What Next?…

ReactiveCocoa Concepts for Asynchronous Libraries

One of the many useful things I’ve found in ReactiveCocoa (a functional reactive programming library for iOS) is the way that it can abstract away the asynchronous callback nature of some iOS core frameworks. And, by making use of RACDisposables, it’s easy to take care of cleanup work like closing connections or stopping a service.

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Why Visual Design is More Than Making Things “Pretty”

Often, teammates who are not designers (by training) will say to me:

Help me make this look pretty. How can we make this look better? I’m not sure what to do here, but what can we do to clean up this screen?

Sometimes designers can be pegged as the person in the office who can make the “pretty pretty” (as my fellow designer Brittany coined it). There are times where I am both flattered by this, but I also find it difficult.
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