Google Sheets’ Query Language

Many of us at Atomic Object leverage spreadsheets for various purposes (estimates, hours tracking, finances, etc.), and since we have strong technical backgrounds, we tend to leverage a lot the functions that spreadsheets provide (avg, max, min, ceiling, sum, etc.). We also tend to push the boundaries of spreadsheets by leveraging multiple functions in one cell and doing some complex filtering. Read more on Google Sheets’ Query Language…

Creating Man Pages in Markdown with Ronn

As brewdo (my tool for sandboxing package management tool Homebrew) expanded and gained more and more options, it became more important for me to document it in an easy-to-use way. Since it’s a command line tool, that meant a man page.

But while the tools for making classic man pages are powerful, they’re also, how shall I say it… historical? And definitely not things I use every day. Thankfully, there’s a modern option that gets me from zero to man page without having to think about skills I left in the dust long ago. Read more on Creating Man Pages in Markdown with Ronn…

Working with Text at the Command Line – Tools for Searching & Editing

I spend more time working with text than anything else. The multi-monitor, high-resolution graphics revolution hasn’t brought me graphics, just dozens of windows full of text. If you’re a software developer, chances are you are swimming in text too. Source code, documentation, configuration files, templates, logs–they are all searchable text. For special purpose tasks, like searching Java classes, I rely on my IDE, but for many things I run a command in a terminal. Read more on Working with Text at the Command Line – Tools for Searching & Editing…

Specifying the Destination of an Unwind Segue Programmatically

I once wrote an iPad app to help people take self-guided tours through a museum. One of the interesting parts of this application was that many of the views were implemented by the same view controller. The functionality of each screen remained the same with slightly different assets in each view. This would be a problem if I needed to Unwind to certain screens in my application.

Read more on Specifying the Destination of an Unwind Segue Programmatically…

autoclave: A Pressure Cooker for Programs

I’ve been working on a multi-threaded, distributed system, and there have been some bugs that only manifested when things lined up exactly right. While the project’s deterministic elements have lots of unit and system tests, every once in a while mysterious failures have appeared.

On top of the other tests, the code is full of asserts for numerous boundary conditions, and stress tests intentionally overload the system in several ways trying to see if they trigger. While the system is generally stable, every once in a while something has still happened due to unusual thread interleaving or network timing, and these issues can be extraordinarily difficult to reproduce. Read more on autoclave: A Pressure Cooker for Programs…

Setting Up a Project Workspace in Tmux

As a developer, I spend a lot of time working in the terminal. Besides starting long-running daemons such as web servers in the terminal, I also use Git, Vim, and other command line tools throughout the day, and terminal sessions tend to pile up. On any given day, I can have more than a dozen terminal sessions open at a time, and that’s just for one project. Read more on Setting Up a Project Workspace in Tmux…

Read more on Setting Up a Project Workspace in Tmux…

Custom Animation for an Unwind Segue

On the first post in this series, someone left a comment asking, “What do you do if you want a custom segue transition for the unwind?” I thought that was a great topic to cover since most people only worry about the transitions going forward on a navigation stack and don’t think about how to transition when you unwind several layers back.

Read more on Custom Animation for an Unwind Segue…

Stow Your Dotfiles – GNU Stow for Managing Symlinks

If you’ve done much work with command line tools, you’ve undoubtedly wrestled with dotfiles, those pesky configuration files in your home directory that are hidden from view by having a dot at the beginning of their name. Bash uses a .bashrc configuration file. Vim uses a .vimrc file and a .vim directory for additional scripts. Tmux uses a .tmux.conf file. Git uses a global .gitconfig. Untold other tools follow the pattern.

Read more on Stow Your Dotfiles – GNU Stow for Managing Symlinks…