Remote File Editing Over SSH with Visual Studio Code

Recently, I needed to add an entry to the local domain name server on my home network. For many years, I have used Emacs to edit files on the terminal both locally and on remote systems. However, over the past year or so, I’ve become familiar with Visual Studio Code, and I very much enjoy its editing experience. I searched through the available extensions and found one called Remote VSCode.


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Integrating a Visual Git Interface into Your Workflow

Like many other developers at Atomic, my Git workflow relies heavily on the command line. I recently started using Visual Studio Code since my editor of choice, Spacemacs, did not have great React and TypeScript support.

Since I started using VS Code’s Git interface, I have seen an improvement in my productivity. Here are some benefits to using a GUI in your Git workflow. Read more on Integrating a Visual Git Interface into Your Workflow…

My Swift Tool Belt, (Part 5): Adding a Gradient UIButton

The fifth item in my Swift Tool Belt is a class derived from UIButton that will draw your button with a gradient background. It will also expose the colors of your gradient in the attributes inspector of Xcode and render the gradient button directly in your storyboard. Read more on My Swift Tool Belt, (Part 5): Adding a Gradient UIButton…

Chrome Caching in CircleCI

I’ll just come right out and say it: CircleCI is an excellent continuous integration platform, and you should probably consider using it (or at least be aware of it). CircleCI is extremely flexible, yet it works very well out of the box. You can configure it as much or as little as needed, and you get quite a bit of functionality with just a simple YAML file and a GitHub repo.
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Five Build Commands to Make Project Onboarding Faster & Easier

New team members shouldn’t have to spend their time probing the subtle differences between their MacBook and yours while reading a lovingly worded project_treatise.md. They should be able to jump in and run the project in 10 minutes, flat.

So next time you start a new project, try writing your Makefile before you write the Readme. You’ll spend a bit more time upfront building automation, but it will pay off when collaborators join you. Here are five commands that I add to every project to make joining up fast and painless. Read more on Five Build Commands to Make Project Onboarding Faster & Easier…

Six Strategies to Spend Less Time Debugging

Debugging is a drag. I think we can all agree that working on new code is generally more fun and interesting than debugging or maintaining existing code. But the fact is that much of our time is spent doing the latter. When estimating time required a project or feature, it is practically impossible to predict the time required for debugging. Read more on Six Strategies to Spend Less Time Debugging…