Software Feature Prioritization – Pruning the Product Tree

You’re about to launch the MVP of your product—but in the background, there’s a never-ending stream of feature requests from stakeholders who have waited months (if not longer) for their idea to reach the top of the list. Where do you begin to prioritize these requests and foster shared ownership of the outcomes? Read more on Software Feature Prioritization – Pruning the Product Tree…

Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 9 – Rose, Bud, Thorn

Welcome to our series on Design Thinking methods and activities. You’ll find a full list of posts in this series at the end of the page.

Rose, Bud, Thorn may be the most commonly used Design Thinking activity at Atomic due to its versatility and ease of use. Read more on Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 9 – Rose, Bud, Thorn…

The Untapped Value of Play in Design

I was listening to a Hidden Brain episode in which the host, Shankar Vedantam, and psychology professor Alison Gopnik discuss the idea of play as a tool for children to learn. In this episode, they don’t describe “play” the way that you, I, and even the Merriam-Webster dictionary do; rather, they describe it as “…trying out lots and lots of different options and get a lot of information about how the [world] works.” Read more on The Untapped Value of Play in Design…

Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 7 – Competitors & Complementors Map

Welcome to our series on Design Thinking methods and activities. You’ll find a full list of posts in this series at the end of the page.

The Competitors/Complementors Map is an excellent way to visualize a company’s or product’s place in its industry’s competitive landscape. It also reveals how products can compete with or complement one another.
Read more on Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 7 – Competitors & Complementors Map…

Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 6 – Card Sorting

Welcome to our series on Design Thinking methods and activities. You’ll find a full list of posts in this series at the end of the page.

Card Sorting

Card sorting works by presenting participants with a set of pre-made cards and asking them to prioritize or organize them into groups. In the context of user research, you might be trying to understand what motivates a user most (or least). And for information architecture, you might want to see how a user might sort navigational items in groups to build-out an IA. Read more on Design Thinking Toolkit, Activity 6 – Card Sorting…