Importing with Absolute Paths using webpack in JavaScript/TypeScript

Using relative paths in your import statements is great for “Hello World” examples and blog posts. But when used in large projects with hundreds of files and deep hierarchical directory structures, relative paths become a nightmare (see Rob Ashton’s post Stop using relative paths in your JavaScripts for some of the reasons why this is so). Read more on Importing with Absolute Paths using webpack in JavaScript/TypeScript…

Announcing the 2017 Atomic Games!

It’s time for our third annual Atomic Games! This programming challenge provides a great learning opportunity for college students and a chance to interview with Atomic in a fun, low-pressure environment. We were delighted by student interest and enthusiastic participation in last year’s Games, and we have some key enhancements for 2017.

Read more on Announcing the 2017 Atomic Games!…

Time and Relative Distance in Source (Code)

Reasoning about a program’s behavior is extremely tricky in the best of circumstances. When you throw in asynchronicity, it is the absolute worst. It’s like your code is trapped in a convoluted time travel movie. You want to perform some operation, but that requires stepping into a time portal and coming out at some indeterminate future date. Who knows what has changed since you’ve been gone? Add a few more asynchronous operations, and your code very quickly becomes a tangled mess of wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey stuff. Read more on Time and Relative Distance in Source (Code)…

Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 2: Building the Front End

In this post, we will finally be setting up the Ember front end to request data from the Rails back end we got up and running in my previous post: Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 1: Setting up the API. If you’ve already followed along with those steps, then you’re all set to get started here! Read more on Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 2: Building the Front End…

Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 1: Setting up the API

Earlier this year, I wrote a post about Getting Started with Rails and Ember CLI shortly after on-boarding onto my project. I didn’t originally plan on writing more tutorials with those technologies, but months after that guide was published, I received a comment asking if I would considering doing just that.

Read more on Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 1: Setting up the API…

Finding Inspiration for Conference Talks and Blog Posts

This September, I will be giving a talk at the KWSQA Targeting Quality conference, and then in November, I’ll be doing a presentation at AtomicCon (the internal conference and getaway that our company arranges every other year). I also write a blog post here every 40 days, helping our marketing goals by “sharing the pain” through a constant stream of blog posts.

Where do I find the inspiration for what to talk about at these events? What to blog about? I use two main sources. Read more on Finding Inspiration for Conference Talks and Blog Posts…

Five Sketch Plugins I Could Not Live Without

I love Sketch for a multitude of reasons—including the massive library of plugins available to maximize its potential and seamlessly fit it into your workflow. Being a curious person, I’ve spent a lot of time testing out various plugins. These are the five I find myself using on a regular basis. Read more on Five Sketch Plugins I Could Not Live Without…

.NET Core, OSX, libcurl, and OpenSSL

.NET Core makes it convenient to develop and test C# code across platforms. On my current project, this means we can do much of our work on Macs without ever firing up a Windows VM.

Even the best abstraction layers occasionally leak, though. Here’s a story of an OSX-specific issue we encountered, what we learned, and how to resolve it. Read more on .NET Core, OSX, libcurl, and OpenSSL…

loading…