A Moral Justification for Diversity In Tech – Why “Good for Business” Isn’t Good Enough

This past weekend, a memo by a Google employee criticizing the company’s diversity goals and practices was leaked to the media. The memo presents sexist and thoroughly debunked views about women, and the ensuing conversation about diversity has been both heated and informative. I have found, however, that there’s something mostly missing from this conversation: a moral case for diversity.

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My Swift Tool Belt (Part 4): Extending UITableViewController

The last post in my Swift Tool Belt series is an extension for UITableViewController. A UITableViewController is a view controller with a table view that takes up the entire screen. My extension provides a couple of methods to resize the header and footer of a table view. Read more on My Swift Tool Belt (Part 4): Extending UITableViewController…

Running the Current Test File in VS Code

For the last few months, I’ve been using Visual Studio Code on a Node.js project. It’s a pretty great editor, and its support for TypeScript is fantastic. As part of my normal workflow, I try to follow TDD practices as much as possible. For efficiency’s sake, I like to execute the tests in the test file I’m currently editing, right from the editor (I’ve written about setting up Vim to run the current test file in an external terminal in the past). Read more on Running the Current Test File in VS Code…

Three Reasons To Keep Your Frameworks Up To Date

Frameworks are constantly changing and evolving—especially open-source ones, which we rely heavily on at Atomic. And it’s not always easy to stay up to date.

Updates sometimes deprecate APIs or introduce new architecture patterns. These changes can require significant rework of a project, and they are expensive for customers. Nevertheless, updates are worth it. In the long run, the expense of keeping your project’s technologies up-to-date greatly outweighs the cost. Read more on Three Reasons To Keep Your Frameworks Up To Date…

Intro to Mocking with Moq

It’s easy to overlook the importance of unit testing. Writing tests can be tedious. They must be updated constantly as code is refactored, and when you have a large code base, you may have to write many tests to even come close to testing all cases. Despite this, unit testing is a necessary part of creating clean, working code. One way to make the testing process easier is through the use of mocks. Read more on Intro to Mocking with Moq…

Finding Your Path to a Second Career in Software Development

When I went back to school to pursue a bachelor’s degree in computer science, I found that I wasn’t alone. Even though I already had one degree and a few years of work experience, I went to study groups where I was the youngest person in the room.

Lots of people are investing in a second career, and for good reason. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer and IT occupations are slated to grow almost twice as fast as the national average and pay more than twice as much. The the ratio of open jobs to new grads with CS degrees is 10:1. Read more on Finding Your Path to a Second Career in Software Development…

Curriculum & Goals for the Atomic Accelerator’s Second Year

May signaled the start of our initial Accelerator cohort’s second year, and with it, a new focus for our curriculum. Our first year was packed with technical content, but recently, we’ve been reading books like Influencer, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ, Coaching for Performance, Crucial Accountability, and The Five Dysfunctions of a Team.

During the second year of the program, we’ll develop four key skills: accountability, conflict resolution, mentorship, and leadership. We’ll work on each skill using both a personal and team perspective.
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My Swift Tool Belt (Part 3): Extending UILabel

The next items in my Swift Tool Belt series are a couple of extensions on UILabel. These extensions will allow easy access to modify the edge insets on a label (the extra padding all around the text). There’s also an extension to add a rotation transform to a label. All of these extensions will be IBDesignable and IBInspectable for easy modification from Xcode’s Interface Builder.
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Using Nested Symbols in Sketch to Build Powerful, Customizable, Enterprise UI Mock-ups – Part 3: Putting it All Together

In the previous two posts, we went through creating some basic building blocks, such as colors and icons as symbols, and combining them into nested symbols for buttons and table cell elements.

If you’ve already read those two posts, I hope you were able to think of other elements that could be “symbolized”–such as primary and secondary navigation, form elements, and other widgets.

Today, I want to talk about how we can put all of these elements together to quickly create Enterprise UI mock-ups that are flexible and customizable.
Read more on Using Nested Symbols in Sketch to Build Powerful, Customizable, Enterprise UI Mock-ups – Part 3: Putting it All Together…

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