Experimenting with MongoDB

For a recent prototype, we wanted to bring in a database instead of relying on something like Google Sheets. I’d heard about MongoDB as part of the MERN (MongoDB, Express, React, and Node.js) or MEAN (MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, and Node.js) stacks and felt it was worth a try. In the end, I was very happy with my experience using it for a small prototype application.
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Leveraging the Boundary Between Client and Server in a REST API

I recently encountered an interesting problem while sketching out a RESTful API for a side project with the JSON API specification. I’m definitely not the first person to run into this problem, but it ended up being a great thought exercise for designing APIs and better understanding the client-server relationship. Read more on Leveraging the Boundary Between Client and Server in a REST API…

React and TypeScript – The Basics

React is great, and with TypeScript, it can be even better.

If you haven’t used TypeScript with React, you might be wondering how much work is required to get started, and how React development with TypeScript is different than JavaScript. I’m going to address these questions, covering everything I would have liked to find in one place when I was getting started with TypeScript—specifically, what is required to set up a React/TypeScript project, and how some of the basic React/Redux type definitions work. Read more on React and TypeScript – The Basics…

Importing with Absolute Paths using webpack in JavaScript/TypeScript

Using relative paths in your import statements is great for “Hello World” examples and blog posts. But when used in large projects with hundreds of files and deep hierarchical directory structures, relative paths become a nightmare (see Rob Ashton’s post Stop using relative paths in your JavaScripts for some of the reasons why this is so). Read more on Importing with Absolute Paths using webpack in JavaScript/TypeScript…

Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 2: Building the Front End

In this post, we will finally be setting up the Ember front end to request data from the Rails back end we got up and running in my previous post: Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 1: Setting up the API. If you’ve already followed along with those steps, then you’re all set to get started here! Read more on Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 2: Building the Front End…

Data with Rails and Ember CLI, Part 1: Setting up the API

Earlier this year, I wrote a post about Getting Started with Rails and Ember CLI shortly after on-boarding onto my project. I didn’t originally plan on writing more tutorials with those technologies, but months after that guide was published, I received a comment asking if I would considering doing just that.

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Three Tips for Migrating from JavaScript to TypeScript

Over time, and especially in the past few years, the tech community has gotten sick of JavaScript and its loose typing. Trying to write a complicated program without static types is like driving at night without headlights—you’ll probably be fine for a while, but there’s a good chance you’ll crash a few times along the way. Read more on Three Tips for Migrating from JavaScript to TypeScript…

Collecting Form Data with a Google Chrome Extension

Recently, I was interested in creating a Google Chrome extension that would work similarly to a password manager, such as LastPass, to monitor the data in form submissions. Working on this task is actually what led to my last blog post, a lighthearted take on my mental stages of programming. Read more on Collecting Form Data with a Google Chrome Extension…